Filling in…


Another two (partial) days of work to document. I filled in the wishbones with the same book-matched cedar that I used in the center of the hull. I left the ends overhanging into what will be the cockpit opening. I also began filling in on the outside of the wishbones…

Inflection


OK, so it's been another two days without a post. Well, I have the same excuse as before, I am trying to have a life outside of kayak building; and guess what, I am succeeding at least a little. This time it was Ethiopian food (along with wonderful company) which…

Pin-striping


I didn't post a blog yesterday. What can I say, I have a life (barely) outside of kayak building. Anyway I was taking advantage of the cosmopolitan aspects of Pittsburgh and went on a date last night and couldn't be bothered updating the site afterward. So, I now have two…

Deck work


I finally got into the swing of things on the deck. Yesterday was another rather uneventful and frustrating day, but today I have turned the corner. I now have the deck shear strip installed on both sides, along with the first strips of palownia which is what most of the…

Scallop curves defined


Today was a rather unproductive day. I worked on the kayak all day, but I didn't seem to accomplish much. Actually, I did a lot of things that needed doing, but I was left with little to show for all my work. First, I decided to break all the stations…

Hull finished!!!


I fitted the last piece for the hull and, after admiring my work for longer than I'd care to admit, modified the stands to become cradles to support the hull while I am working on the deck. I used some foam along with some 2x4 scraps to rig the cradle…

Fitting the final piece


The technique for fitting the last piece is similar to the standard tapering method, except that you can't fit the full size strip into the space available anywhere. Essentially you've reached a point where the taper from one end is overlapping the taper from the other end. I started off…

Some hot-gluing techniques


Hot-glue can be used not only for anchoring the strips to the stations, but also to help hold regular glue joints tight temporarily while the glue dries. I often use scraps of strips to hold a joint together. The first two photos show some examples of this, one using a…

Tapering the ends


The strips I have been installing today required both ends to be tapered. I decided to include a video on one way to quickly make an accurate taper. I can't take credit for this method as I have seen it (or variations) in more than one place, but I can…

Time-Lapse video


I decided to do a time-lapse video on my Mac today using a free program called Gawker. This video represents over 4 hours of work. Despite being sped up greatly, I think it shows how quickly the strips can be installed once you have your technique mastered. In four hours…

Adding a feature line


With the keel strips in place, I wanted to add a feature line of dark wenge wood. I split some strips down to about 3/8" wide and installed them next to my strips that I had run parallel to the shear strips (not against the keel strips.) I had to…

Installing the keel strips


Once the sides of the hull start closing up at the bow and stern, it becomes easier to install a pair of strips along the keel line and then fill in the remaining area. The first keel strip was beveled so that its edge that is along the keel line…

Subsequent strips


Each subsequent strip is installed in the same manner as the second strip, except that most will require some planing to make a tight joint. The angle of the edge needs to change along the length of the strip. This is called a rolling bevel. It is quite easy and…

Installing the second strip


The second strip is glued to the first strip and hot glued to the stations.  The hot glue holds it in place while the normal glue dries.  You only need a small drop to hold sufficiently. Make sure to use glue sticks made for wood. I found mine online at…

Installing the shear strip


The shear strip is the first strip to be installed. It is located on the hull side of the shear line (the line that separates the hull from the deck, also the widest part of kayak.) It is hot glued to the stations and glued to the internal stem pieces…

Revised 3d kayak animation


[iframe http://www.nomad-unlimited.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/kayak1.html 605 381] Drag the image to animate it. It may take a few moments to load the images. Background image courtesy of wallpaperstock.net I wasn't completely happy with my transition from the high deck to the normal deck, so I decided to revise that.  I ended up making…

“Book-matching” strips


One of the cedar boards I got had a band of darker grain running through it which makes for some striking patterns when "book-matching." Since I first cut the 2x4 into four 1.5x0.75" pieces and then each piece into six 3/4x3/16" strips, essentially a matrix of 4x6 strips per board,…

Shop organization


I decided to get my work shop in some semblance of order before continuing. I had already constructed some supports to hold the strong-back, but they needed some reinforcing. I also made some removable shelves that rest on the strong-back (idea courtesy of Nick Schade.) I made a storage rack…

Building the skeleton


The skeleton consists of the stations strung out along the strong-back. I constructed the strong-back out of plywood, a 2x5" box beam screwed together. It came out remarkably straight despite some bowing to the plywood I used. Once I strung the stations on and started aligning them, however, I discovered…

Cutting the stations


Once my plans arrived, I set off for my sister Deb's house in Ohio. Russ, my brother-in-law, has a nice workshop in the basement and a band-saw that I knew I would need. Vaclav Stejskal of One Ocean Kayaks provides full size plans so there is no need to piece…

3d kayak animation


[iframe http://www.nomad-unlimited.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/kayak.html 605 455] Drag the image to animate it. It may take a few moments to load the images. Here is a 3d version of my kayak courtesy of Google Sketchup. I modeled the kayak in Rhino (an interesting project) and brought it into Sketchup and exported this animation.…

Milling the strips


I stayed at brother Chuck's house in Maryland after OkumeFest and found a local source of wood. I had decided upon western red cedar for the hull and palownia for the deck along with some dark colored wood for trim lines. I ordered two 2x4x18' of cedar and was delighted…

OkumeFest


I attended a wooden boat festival called OkumeFest in Annapolis, Maryland on May 14 and 15, 2010.  Okume is the type of plywood used by many boat builders, but they had lots of strip-built boats which were what I was interested in seeing.  There were some beautiful boat examples as…

Kayak


I am building a strip-built wooden sea kayak in Pittsburgh and documenting the process. Here are the basic steps greatly simplified: Buy a set of kayak plans. Cutout out the cross-section shapes of the kayak from the plans (called stations.) Glue these to plywood and cut out the shapes of…